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Mack Khen berries from the Luang Prabang forests

Berries are very rich in essential oil and must be harvested when fully ripe when they open to release their seeds. Aromatic notes are fresh, fruity, mixture of humus, moss, scent of undergrowth, turpentine, resinous sap, citrus and more specifically very ripe mandarin or even candied mandarin, then small hints. eucalyptus, menthol, anise, or even angelica. The spiciness is subtle, brief, elegant, with a candied citrus finish.

  • 8,35 €

    Box of 30g (1.06 oz)
    Per kilo price : 278,33 €
  • 100,00 €

    Bag of 1Kg (35.27 oz)
  • 60,00 €

    Bag of 500g (17.64 oz)
    Per kilo price : 120,00 €

Botany : Zanthoxylum rhetsa
Origine : Luang Prabang mountains, Laos
Ingredients : 100 % Zanthoxylum Rhetsa
Storage : Away from light, heat and moisture.
Le Comptoir des Poivres' scale (?) :
Réf : CDPMSL14_P

Mack Khen berries from the Luang Prabang forests

 

Mack Khen berries are very present on the mountainous reliefs of Vietnam and Laos.
They are harvested by the villagers and are essential in daily cooking and pharmacopoeia.
The Luang Prabang region has managed to preserve its mountains from deforestation.
This allows Zanthoxylum Rhetsa, the Mack Khen berries tree to endure.

This tree has thorns on its trunk and branches and produces berry clusters of very interesting elegance and aromatic complexity.

Harvesting these berries is complicated because they are located on the upper part of the tree.

Ground, Mack Khen berries will appreciate mango, pineapple, banana, goat cheese, duck breast, rare and juicy grilled red meats, grilled fish (sea bream, mackerel, sardines, cod, pollock), scallops, cephalopods, scampi carpaccios, obsiblue prawns, grilled pork fatty meats, or even the chocolate that it magnifies wonderfully.

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Mack Khen berries from the Luang Prabang forests

Mack Khen berries from the Luang Prabang forests

Berries are very rich in essential oil and must be harvested when fully ripe when they open to release their seeds. Aromatic notes are fresh, fruity, mixture of humus, moss, scent of undergrowth, turpentine, resinous sap, citrus and more specifically very ripe mandarin or even candied mandarin, then small hints. eucalyptus, menthol, anise, or even angelica. The spiciness is subtle, brief, elegant, with a candied citrus finish.